22 Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo for Foreigners

Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo - Cover

This article is part of our series on finding a job in Japan and Tokyo

Finding a part-time job in Tokyo can be a challenge. That's why we created a whole list of places that offer part-time work for people like you! Never fear, we'll cover the most common part-time jobs in Tokyo.

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Go Kart Driver in Tokyo

The first fun part-time job in Tokyo is a Go Kart tour guide. While traveling around Tokyo, you may have seen the tiny cars from Mario Kart zooming by with drivers in cosplay as characters from the popular game. As a go kart guide, you will learn Tokyo in and out, and you're probably not required to use much Japanese. The position requires an international driver's license or a license from one of the following countries (with a Japanese Translation by an authorized organization):

  • Switzerland, Germany, France, Taiwan, Belgium, Slovenia, Monaco

Typical Salary:

¥960-¥1,100 an hour 

The do not have a career or recruiting page on their website, but they have been known to post go-kart positions on GaijinPot.

    Lego Land Japan Playmaker

    Do you remember those awesomely designed plastic blocks from your childhood? Did you know that they originated in Denmark? 

    The second part-time job in Tokyo we're going to feature is a Lego Land Discover Center Playmaker. The Lego Land Japan team hires foreigners to work in the Japan Resort theme park in Nagoya and the Lego discovery centers in Osaka and Tokyo.

    Typical Salary has not been disclosed.

    A previous job ad they posted online says the hourly rate is around ¥1300, so it doesn't pay as much as teaching children English. However, all your customers want to be there instead of being "encouraged" by parents to attend. You can apply directly at the Legoland Japan page for these part-time jobs in Tokyo.

      Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo -Restaurant

      Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Restaurant Positions

      For dining out, Tokyo has tons of options. From traditional ramen or udon to Japanese BBQ to modern chains, you can find something delicious to eat. Many restaurants are searching for employees, and what better way to interact with the local people than to serve them food? Serving positions are the most common part-time jobs in Tokyo for foreigners, and you can work for almost any restaurant.

      Here is a list of restaurants that do hire foreign staff to create that exotic feel; they may even have many customers who are foreigners, so you won't feel so far from home. Any part-time job that involves dealing with Japanese customers will most likely require daily conversational skills of Japanese.

      Typical Salary:

      ¥900 - ¥1100 an hour

      Job Boards

      Food Job Japan - General Part-Time Jobs Search Site

      Links to Positions 

      Positions at Shake Shack Burger

      Positions at Blu Jam Cafe

      Position at Umami Burger - Tokyo

      Positions at Tyson's - Not connected to Tyson Chicken

      Positions at Hidakaya Restaurant 

      Positions at MOS BURGER 

      Note: MOS BURGER will interview you in Japanese. 

        Themed restaurants

        One of the most unique types of business in Japan is the themed restaurants. These are really popular, so expect to see lots of customers if you choose to work there. You can work in a ninja themed restaurant or a butler cafe.

        Working part-time jobs at a themed restaurant in Tokyo is an interesting option if you want to have an adventure. New restaurants with different themes do come and go, so pick a cafe that has some longevity before you apply.

        This job will stand out on your resume, so don't be scared: apply now!

        Typical Salary:

        ¥1100-¥1300 an hour

        Links to Positions

        Butlers Cafe

        Sugoi Kawaii Maid Cafe

        Kawaii Monster Cafe- Page in Japanese.

          Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Bars

          In many countries, working at a bar is common, and Tokyo is no different. In the bar, you can observe the customers, chat with the people there, and meet newcomers every time. This is the perfect job for anyone who enjoys being in a loud and fast-paced environment.

          Working in a bar is normal for students trying to make some extra cash. It's generally after class hours and flexible to schedule shifts. Please bear in mind that working as a bartender in a host or hostess club or any other red light district businesses is not allowed for those on a student visa or working holiday visa.

          There are a decent amount of part-time bar staff jobs in Tokyo, but you may have to go old school and check the weekly and monthly free English magazines like Metropolis and Tokyo Time Out.

          There are many foreign owned bars scattered around Tokyo, and here are some where I have definitely seen foreigners working. Some of these businesses have been cracking down on smoking; if you do not like the smell of smoke, make sure to confirm with the bar before signing on. Since tips are not socially acceptable in Japan, the amount listed in the job ad is the amount you'll take home at the end of the day.

          The good news is that you'll hardly ever experience fights, and you'll see less of the ridiculousness that can happen when people get trashed. This is definitely one of the more fun of the part-time jobs in Tokyo.

          Typical Salary:

          ¥1100 - ¥1300 an hour 

          (Ginza and Roppongi Areas offer up to 2000, especially if you're female)

          Job Boards

          Food Job Japan - General Job Search Site

          Tokyo Notice Board

          Links to Positions 

          R2 Supper Club - Part time jobs in Tokyo

          MAN IN THE MOON PUBS

          Quest Roppongi 

          After the menu list, you will see it says "recruit." Read the information and then send your resume to the email shown. 

            Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo -Juice Bars

            Juice Bars

            Juice bars are trending in Tokyo right now, so squeeze on in. These hot spots span the refreshment range from serving standard juices and smoothies to specializing in organic and vegan-friendly drink concoctions. Even the JR company runs its own juice bar, which you can find serving affordable juices in the train stations of Tokyo. Although the railway may not be hiring someone without Japanese skills, we have found several places that do hire foreigners or have an English career page.

            Most of the smaller, locally-owned juice bars have a strong mission and commitment to a healthy, connected life, and some may offer nice perks for someone like you. You'll also have access to some hard-to-find vegetables and fruits that will sweeten up your day. Go ahead and start juicing it up with this smooth part-time job in Tokyo!

            Typical Salary:

            ¥950-¥1100 an hour

            Positions

            Sunshine Juice

            The employee prices differ depending on whether you are store staff, kitchen staff, or delivery staff.

            Why Juice?

              Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo - Cook

              Cooks and food preparers

              In Tokyo, you can apply for cooking positions, though you may not have many options to choose from. If you enjoy cooking and have one to two year's experience in professional food service, you can apply for a cooking job. Do note that depending on the restaurant, Japanese proficiency may be required. This opportunity will give you the chance to learn and grow as a professional food service engineer. Get into the mix of things with a part-time job in Tokyo's cooking industry.

              Typical Salary: 

              ¥1100-¥1500 an hour

              Job Boards

              Craiglist's Part Time Cooking Jobs

                English Teacher for Children

                Although many foreigners are tired of being limited to English-teaching positions for part-time work, the high demand and nice hourly wages mean you sometimes have to go where the money is.

                The king of all part-time jobs in Tokyo is teaching children. This is probably the most common job that university and Japanese language students  find themselves doing after coming to Japan. Aside from the pay, the great part about being a part-time English teacher is working with children that grow to look up to you and getting to do fun lessons! There are quite a few things you'll want to keep in mind when looking for a job teaching children.

                Ask questions about the curriculum during the interview

                Some children's English schools and Kindergartens will have a curriculum in place,  which they expect you to follow, and have a clear methodology of teaching. There are also places that have no teaching materials whatsoever, relying on their (often) inexperienced but passionate foreign teachers to come in with their own material.

                Some teachers can handle the workload and even enjoy the freedom of making their own lessons. Just keep in mind that the preparation of these materials will likely come from time taken at home, so you'll be doing a lot of work off the clock. These local schools normally believe that by paying a you nice hourly rate, they do not need to shoulder the burden of creating or buying a curriculum.

                Other points to mention

                Don't forget to ask about dress codes, lesson preparation, curriculum, and what training they will or will not provide. There are some children's schools that have structure and are well-run operations, but more often than not they're just good at gathering students. The larger the operation, the more guidance they will have built into their system. However, that's a double-edged sword: the more support they provide, the lower the pay will be. You have to weigh these factors when considering teaching children part-time in Tokyo.

                Job Boards

                I personally recommend going with Jobs in Japan. If a school is willing to pay money for a job ad, it usually means that they have a set system in place and want quality teachers. You can also find many foreign-owned job postings there.

                Ohayo Sensei provides free job boards, and many of the posters are foreigners who own their own language school.

                Want more information on teaching English? Check out our comprehensive guide to Teaching English in Japan!

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                  Part Time Job in Tokyo at OCE
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                  In addition to awesome articles, we also run an English school with more than 100 teachers and 7000 students in 10 locations in Tokyo.

                  Teaching English to Adults

                  Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Teach English For Adults

                  English has become the essential language to know; even if you do not know the language of the country you're visiting, you can always find part-time jobs in Tokyo teaching English. While children require the largest number of teachers, many adults want classes as well. If working with children isn't your preference, you can make decent money teaching those out of school.

                  Depending on the language school, the employment requirements vary. Some language schools require you to have certificates, such as TESOL or TEFL. The TEFL test shows proof that you have good English skills and is recognized by many institutions, while TESOL shows proof that a person is a good English teacher. Some institutions may require relevant experience in teaching, especially teaching English as a foreign language. 

                  But at some schools, like One Coin English, certificates and years of experiences may not be necessary. OCE will test your English by asking you to write a paragraph over a topic you're interested in, and then they will have a Skype interview with you. The next step is a demo lesson, where you are joined by one or two recruiters and possibly a Japanese staff member. The final step would be an interview with the teacher manager. The recruitment process is four stages because OCE really wants to give candidates the chance to use their skills and help students improve their English language skills.

                  Typical Salary:

                  ¥1,000-¥2000 per lesson

                  Positions

                  Gaba 

                  Berlitz

                  Rosetta Stone

                    Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Chat Host for an English Cafe

                    Most Japanese people learn English at a young age and can read and write to some degree. Spoken English, however, is an area that the Japanese education system falls behind in. Various options have opened up to fill this gap in the Japanese education system, mainly Eikaiwas and English cafes. English cafes have been growing in popularity around Tokyo for some time and are a great option for locals looking to brush up on speaking English. There are some foreigners who swear it's the go-to part-time job in Tokyo, while others prefer positions that are faster-paced. 

                    For those who don't know, English cafes are staffed with English speakers (Hosts) that facilitate English conversation for the customers that visit. There are also companies that have agreements with restaurants and cafes to borrow space for use as cafes in different areas of Tokyo.

                    The Host's role is that of a conversation facilitator. Their responsibilities would be introducing fun and engaging topics for the patrons and keeping the conversation flowing smoothly. Unlike an English teaching or Eikaiwa position,  you do not have to conduct classes or teach anything as the focus is just practicing conversation. One of the biggest perks of working as a chat host is flexibility and how laid back it is. In terms of the scheduling, most places are quite lax about the days that you work per week and taking time off. In addition to all that you will be getting coffees and (non-alcoholic) drinks on the job for a discounted price.

                    That being said, with all the good that comes with working at English cafes there are some downsides. The biggest one being that unlike eikaiwas and other English teaching positions, there is usually no limit to how long a customer can stay at your table/join in on the conversation. Having the same customer for 5 hours straight can be downright exhausting (How many people do you know you could speak to continuously for that long?!) and English Cafes rarely have limits on how long a student can stay in the group.

                    Regarding the salary, it does tend to be lower than eikaiwas. Most English Cafes are on a reservation-based system as well, so with cafes that aren't as busy or are overstaffed, the pay can be a bit inconsistent.  

                    For the English cafe companies that rent spaces, you will also be traveling to many different locations which can be nice at first but tends to get exhausting after a few months.

                    In the end though, if you want a laid back option for part-time jobs in Tokyo, English Cafes are a choice to definitely consider!

                    To check out a few English Cafes (and a few other language cafes!) there is a list with some links below!

                    Typical Salary:

                    ¥1,000-¥1,300 an hour

                    Links to Positions at English Cafes 

                    Lancul

                    Leaf Cup 

                    Cafe Eikaiwa 

                    Norton Place 

                    There are also a few cafes that offer languages aside from English:

                    Link to Positions at Multiple Languages Cafe.

                    Mickey House

                    Mickey House offers other languages such as German, French, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Hindi, Thai, Indonesian, Japanese, Polish, Thai, Korean, Vietnamese and Portuguese.

                      Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo-Nanny

                      Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Nanny and Babysitter

                      If you enjoy looking after kids, then this is the perfect job for you! Why don't you make your part-time job in Tokyo fun by taking care of kids? The perks of this job are that you'll have flexible working times and you'll be matched with a family situated close to your accommodation, so you don't have to travel too far.

                      Upload your resume and include your nationality, the primary language you speak, your nearest station, and when you're going to leave Japan. Please note that you should be available to work at least twice per week for half a year. Set your availability, and the company will try their best to put you with a family. Carefinder, an online company, gives potential nannies more freedom to select what age group you want to look after, what languages you want/need them to speak, and the hourly rate that you are interested in. Check out the links below to be updated on the nanny and caretaker jobs.

                      Typical Salary varies and is sometimes negotiable but hourly rate usually is between ¥1000-¥4000 an hour

                      Link to Job Boards

                      AuPair Nanny Jobs

                      Link to Position

                      Care Finder Nanny Jobs

                      Experience of a Nanny in Tokyo: Blog

                      Savvy Tokyo

                      Looking for a Full-Time Job?

                      Check out our article on getting a full-time job in Japan.

                      Looking for a Visa?

                      Check our article on your options for getting a visa to stay in Japan.

                      Wedding Celebrant

                      This might be a part-time job in Tokyo that you never thought actually exists! Think of the chapels in Las Vegas or Reno, where a person in costume officiates the wedding ceremony. All that legally matters is their ability to sign off on the paperwork, not their actual religion or belief system.

                      Being a "fake" wedding priest requires you to know basic Japanese, and you don't need to be licensed. Couples prefer to have male Caucasians and men of color for this particular job. You'll be given the clothing by the agency that hired you and a script to use. All you need to do is attend the weddings on the weekends at the designated chapel. The number of weddings depends on how many weddings get scheduled. You can play being the priest for about 45 mins to an hour and a half. 

                      The best search term is "wedding celebrant" for this part-time job in Tokyo.

                      Typical Salary: 

                      ¥15000-¥20000 for each wedding 

                      Links to Positions: 

                      TMC

                      Nihon shikaishakyokai Co.,Ltd

                      CREMO

                      Fast food delivery

                      Fast Food Delivery

                      Everyone knows that fast food delivery is a growing business world-wide. Many restaurants are providing their foods through different delivery apps; with the growth of technology, you can easily order and get the food in less than 30 mins.

                      Fast food delivery can be a good option as a part-time job in Tokyo. Fast food companies receive many orders and can have a staff shortage; this is where you come in. For this job, vehicles are usually provided by the company, but you obviously need a driver's license. Remember that tipping in Japan is considered very rude.

                      Typical Salary:

                      ¥900- ¥1100 an hour

                      Link to Job Boards

                      Japan Work

                      Links to Positions 

                      Uber Eats

                      McDonalds - Japanese Required

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                      Convenience store staff

                      In Japan, convenience stores are everywhere. Chain stores like Lawson have a 24/7 service, which means you can have a flexible schedule. Just bear in mind that most convenience stores require you to have a good knowledge of Japanese. 

                      The good news is that they do hire foreigners, but to be able to provide a high quality service to customers, you need to be able to understand and solve their queries. 

                      Typical Salary:

                      ¥900 - ¥1300 an hour

                      Link to Job Boards

                      Japan Job Seekers

                      Interpreter and Translator

                      If you know Japanese and English at business level and can quickly switch between them, then becoming an interpreter or translator won't be difficult for you. An interpreter translates spoken conversation, and a translator converts a given text into other languages.

                      As an interpreter, you'll translate what both parties are saying and facilitate comprehension. Both the Japanese enterprise and foreign enterprise should understand each other, and you ensure the conversation goes smoothly.

                      Typical Salary:

                      ¥1,500-¥3,100 an hour

                      Requirements: Valid visa and N2 Japanese 

                      Links to Job Boards 

                      English Interpreter

                      Glassdoor Interpreter and Translator Part-Time Jobs

                      English Japanese Translation Work

                      Translation Jobs in Tokyo

                      Links to Positions 

                      Gengo Translation

                      Oyraa

                      Coffee shops

                      Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Coffee Shops

                      A very common part-time job in Tokyo for Japanese, but perhaps not for foreigners, is working at a coffee shop. Here, you can serve customers,  learn how to make delicious coffees, and be a kind welcoming staff. Other duties include cleaning the store, washing dishes, and operating the till.

                      Some coffee shops might ask you for one year's barista experience, but most will train you after you've been there a while. And you can benefit from employee discounts like getting free coffee,  food discounts, and even transportation expenses. Doesn't that sound great?

                      Typical Salary:

                      ¥990-¥1200 an hour

                      Links to Positions 

                      FRANKIE Melbourne Espresso

                      For FRANKIES- on the home page go right to the bottom, there will be several pop up posts and one of them includes "barista wanted" click on that one to get more information. 

                      Blue Bottle Coffee This page is in Japanese.

                      Does anyone know if Starbucks provides part-time jobs in Tokyo for foreigners? I have only seen Korean staff who spoke great Japanese, but I have yet to meet a foreigner. Let us know on Facebook if you have discovered the illustrious unicorn of a foreign Starbucks worker.

                      Even when applying to part-time jobs, you'll still need a resume, so take a look at our Guide to Cover Letters and Resumes for more helpful tips

                      Model

                      Modeling

                      A job that you might not expect to do part time in Tokyo is Modeling. There are many Japanese companies who create advertisements using non-Japanese models to promote their products.

                      The pay can be very high if you find the right position, but you have to do your research carefully. I have heard of positions that don't pay for makeup or expect you to apply your makeup without reimbursement for that time. You may also have a lot of idle unpaid time. While ¥10,000 sounds amazing, it starts to lose its appeal after ten hours!

                      The modeling agencies might be able to get you a TV gig as well. To be honest, I only see around four or five westerners on TV regularly, so making a living doing TV gigs is not something I would recommend to my little brother.

                      Typical Salary:

                      Varies

                      (Magazine work can earn up to ¥10,000 - ¥20,000 per shoot)

                      Links to Positions 

                      Avocado Modelling Agency in Tokyo

                      Free Wave

                      D'Xim

                      BRAVO Models (page in Japanese)

                      Alpha Modelling in Tokyo

                      Remix model

                      Acqua Tokyo

                      Lazaris Tokyo

                      Hype Casting Agency 

                      CDU Modelling

                      Exile Hype

                      aWake Modelling

                      Echoes Modelling in Tokyo

                      Hotel Industry

                      Hotel industries are big on hiring foreigners. Hotels are always looking for people speaking Chinese, Korean, or English, so this is the chance for all of you job seekers to get your foot in the door. 

                      Some of the hotels offer stylish and luxury rooms that make you want to stay there the whole day. Imagine working at the Hilton or Hyatt in Tokyo or at a grand Japanese hotel.

                      Although not based in Tokyo, Niseko has an absolute amazing snowy view. They hire a ton of people on working holiday visas to work up on the slopes and hospitality during the winter season. If you still have time on your visa, you could also head down to Okinawa to staff the resorts during the hectic summer seasons. 

                      I should mention that part-time jobs in Tokyo at a hotel can result in visa sponsorship, and they do hire full-time as well. Often, they want to test out new employees on part-time before making a bigger offer.

                       Typical Salary:

                      ¥900 - ¥1100 an hour

                      Links to Positions in Tokyo 

                       Hilton Hotel Part Time Openings in Tokyo

                      Palace Hotel Part Time in Tokyo employment

                      Links to Positions in Niseko/Okinawa 

                      Niseko/Okinawa Hotel Permanent and Seasonal Positions 

                      Niseko/Okinawa Hotel Season Positions- Front Desk Receptionist 

                      Hotel Okinawa HYATT Room Careers

                      Hotel Okinawa HYATT Guest Service Staff

                        Retail

                        Part-Time Jobs in Tokyo : Retail

                        Retail stores everywhere are a busy environment where the cashier interacts with customers and gives great service to everyone. In Tokyo, you can find retail jobs in any electronic, clothes, or drug stores. It's also helpful knowing another language; since you fit the criteria, why don't you apply for this part-time job in Tokyo?

                        You can also search for full time positions at Uniqlo, H&M, and Gap. Jobs can be in both headquarters and store roles. You can also find contract employment, so you've got lots of choices.

                        Typical Salary:

                        ¥1000- ¥1200 an hour

                        Links to Positions

                        Uniqlo Retail Part Time Position Jobs In Tokyo

                        H&M Retail Part Time Position Jobs in Tokyo

                        GAP Retail Part Time Position (page in Japanese)

                          Event Staff Member

                          The event staff job requires the candidate to prepare for the event and make sure that the venue is ready. This involves making sure that there are enough chairs and tables, doing extra checks on lighting and audio/video, and being sure that the stage is prepared and safe. You might also be required to carry equipment into the venue and then packing it all up.

                          The main priority for the event is to be safe and also make the time fun for everyone. You will also have to serve food and drinks and give good customer service. The particular event will determine how much Japanese you'll need to know.

                          Typical Salary:

                          ¥900-¥1000 an hour

                          Link to Job Boards

                          Event Jobs

                          Link to Positions 

                          AG Company Event Jobs  

                            Freelance Writer

                            With the influx of foreign tourists and an ever increasing amount of foreign residents, the need for English and other language digital content is increasing. Many travel sites offer low rates but provide a paid entrance into the world of freelance writing. After developing some experience, you could then start to approach some of the local magazines and publications for more freelance writing work. You may need another part-time job in Tokyo to get you started, but this is another great option.

                            Write for Arigato Japan 

                            Write for Gaijin Pot Travel 

                            Write for Dig Japan Travel

                            Write for Matcha Travel  

                            Write for Metropolis Japan  

                            Story of someone who became a writer in Japan : https://www.tokyoweekender.com/2018/07/i-gave-up-my-full-time-job-to-be-a-japan-based-travel-writer/

                              Travel Guide

                              Travel Guide

                              The last category of part-time jobs in Tokyo we have to recommend is being a travel guide. You'll have the chance to show groups of people around some amazing sights. You'll guide them around Tokyo and give them insights of the best locations and food. You really need to know your way around Tokyo for this job.

                              There are freelance travel guides that know a lot of information about Japan and how to get around. It's a good idea to observe a tour guide in action and then decide whether you will like the job. Here are some websites of freelance travel guides: 

                              Typical Salary:

                               Varies a lot 

                              Links to Positions

                              Tokyo Freelance Travel Guide Site 

                              The Backstreet Guides Part-Time Positions in Tokyo (page in Japanese)

                              Magical Trip Be a Tour Guide (page in Japanese)

                                Food Tour Guide in Tokyo

                                In Japan you can also go on food tours and be the person in charge. The meeting point can be anywhere in Tokyo, and your role will be to show special foods that might be hard for tourists to locate by themselves. This gives you a chance to help them discover new foods, try something they haven't already in Japan, or sample a special city dish. You can lead specific food tours, like Mt Fuji Food tour or Kyoto Sake Brewery tour.

                                Companies like Arigato Japan do a great job of putting together food tours, so if you want to be a food tour guide, send over your resume. 

                                Typical Salary : ¥900-¥1000 an hour 

                                Links to Positions

                                Arigato Food Tours - With Arigato, you can be a food tour guide or you have the chance to be a social media intern, wordpress intern or freelance content writer so you are not limited to just being a tour guide which is a great opportunity. 

                                Urban Adventures 

                                  Clinical Trials in Tokyo

                                  Obviously we do not recommend doing a clinical trial as a test subject and you are responsible for what happens if you chose this route. However, pharmaceutical companies are looking for trials on foreigners in Japan. Here are several sources to consider in your search.

                                  Clinical Trials Tokyo

                                  There website seems out of date, but based on what we read on Reddit if you join their newsletter, they will send you opportunities that pop up throughout the year.

                                  Medical Volunteer Network

                                  Clinical Trials Japan

                                  This website is the mother load of clinical trials and their website covers everything going on in Japan. The site is frequently updated as well.

                                  Summary

                                  Based on what we read on the internet, some of the companies doing trials will pay you a small fee for a screening session which is essentially a health check and information seminar on the trial.

                                  The most common subject seems to be Caucasians because they would like to market the drug on Western markets, but they also have trials for non-Caucasians as well.

                                  Please be very cautious because the money is good, but you really need to do your research to protect yourself.

                                    Random Jobs in Tokyo

                                    Here are a list of random gigs you can do in Tokyo. Most of these are one time thing and you are done. Since they do not provide enough income to support your stay in Japan we have listed them here.

                                    Mystery Shopper

                                    A mystery shopper is paid by brands to go shopping in their shop and give feedback later on their experience with the staff, the shop, and anything else that can help them improve customer experience for future customers. I have heard of some shady middle-man companies and people not getting paid so we will avoid adding any links here. My best advice would be to avoid ones that are looking for people on Facebook and only go to those with a really nice website or other factors that signal credibility for you. 

                                    Paid Survey and Focus Groups

                                    There are several companies who conduct paid surveys for large companies. These surveys can pay from 500 yen up to 10,000 yen depending on the amount of questions, online or in-person, and the rarity of the person they want to survey.

                                    For example, the one that paid 10,000 yen wanted a person to come in-person and had to be an Australian male in Tokyo. 

                                    The following two companies are the most well-known and tend to do the most surveys. They handle both online and offline surveys.

                                    Yolo Japan Surveys

                                    E Gaikokujin Surveys

                                      Man-who-is-excited-because-of-job

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